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I made a small change to my site, so that bookmarks don't show up in the main feed unless I've commented on them. I tend to bookmark a lot of pages, so this will keep them from clogging up the home page. Plus, it clarifies the difference between bookmarks and boosts/reposts. Now, boosts are posts I don't have anything to add to, but still want to show up on my home page. Bookmarks are pages I want to save for later, but may have something to say about once I read them.

IndieForums looks nice. Seems like it might be a good catalyst for some blogchains and hyperconversations. https://indieforums.net Also on:

Yea that looks like a cool site! I hope it catches on, but we also have IndieNews and Indieweb.xyz and those have never really had huge usage.

I wonder if we just don't have a large enough community, yet, to sustain a forum like this. Or maybe showing the replies inline, like IndieForum, is what the other two were missing. That does make it much easier to follow a conversation.

In this blogpost I argue the case for consigning the term "REST API" to history. In its place we should adopt the terms "HTTP API" and "hypermedia API", which better differentiate two distinctive designs for the programmatic interfaces of web services.

This makes me think about the die-hards who are against the Web as an application platform. They always say the Web was intended as a document platform and therefore shouldn't be used for applications. But Fielding modeled the REST architecture on the Web, and he and others working on the initial tech considered it to be a large, distributed application. So by that line of thinking, the Web as an application platform is nothing new. These separate web apps are just sub-features of the World Wide Web application.

webdev development

In this blogpost I argue the case for consigning the term "REST API" to history. In its place we should adopt the terms "HTTP API" and "hypermedia API", which better differentiate two distinctive designs for the programmatic interfaces of web services.

Fielding's thesis was a kind of retrospective on the design decisions that led to the World Wide Web — a distributed hypermedia-driven information retrieval system — becoming the runaway success it was.

I've read about Fielding's REST dissertation (never actually read the dissertation itself), but this is an interesting way to think about it. I've tried to explain the ideas behind REST to colleagues before, but I don't think I've ever been successful. Describing it with the Web as an example of the architecture makes it much more tangible.

webdev development
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